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9:00-9:15amLarry GoldIntroduction

Biography

Dr. Larry Gold is the Founder and Chairman Emeritus of the Board, and former CEO of SomaLogic. Prior to SomaLogic, he also founded and was the Chairman of NeXagen, Inc., which later became NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, Inc. In 1999, NeXstar merged with Gilead Sciences, Inc. to form a global organization committed to the discovery, development and commercialization of novel products that treat infectious diseases.

During his nearly 10 years at NeXstar, Dr. Gold held numerous executive positions including Chairman of the Board, Executive Vice President of R&D, and Chief Science Officer. Before forming NeXagen, he also co-founded and served as Co-Director of Research at Synergen, Inc., a biotechnology company later acquired by Amgen, Inc. Dr. Gold recently became the CEO of Lab79, a new biotech company in Boulder, Colorado.

Since 1970, Dr. Gold has been a professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. While at the University, he served as the Chairman of the Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Department from 1988 to 1992. Between 1995 and 2013, Dr. Gold received the CU Distinguished Lectureship Award, the National Institutes of Health Merit Award, the Career Development Award, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Colorado Biosciences Association, and the Chiron Prize for Biotechnology. Dr. Gold was also awarded the 8th International Steven Hoogendijk Prize by the Dutch Batavian Society of Experimental Philosophy in 2018.

In addition, Dr. Gold has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 1993 and the National Academy of Sciences since 1995. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Dr. Gold also serves on the Board of Directors for CompleGen, Plato BioPharma, Lab79, Keck Graduate Institute, and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study.

Dr. Gold established the Gold Lab at the University of Colorado Boulder in 1971. Starting with basic research on bacteria and bacteriophage, the lab shifted its focus to human disease following the invention of the SELEX process in 1989. The Gold Lab today focuses on the utilization of biological and information technology to improve healthcare. Dr. Gold also began holding the GoldLab Symposia in 2010, an annual event that tackles big questions in healthcare. He is determined to change healthcare for the better through teaching, research, and debate among scientists and citizens throughout the world.

9:15-10:00amAaron Clauset, University of ColoradoPrediction and Its Limits in Scientific Discovery

Abstract

Prediction and Its Limits in Scientific Discovery

Aaron ClausetThe desire to predict discoveries, to have some idea, in advance, of what will be discovered, by whom, when, and where, pervades nearly all aspects of modern science, from individual scientists to publishers, from funding agencies to hiring committees. The successes and failures of predicting scientific discoveries -- the creation of new knowledge -- have broad implications for understanding the nature of knowledge itself, and the likely future role that computers and artificial intelligence can play in its creation. In this talk, I'll begin with a simple conceptual framework for thinking broadly about prediction and its limits for scientific discovery. I'll then do a dive deep into two areas where accurate predictions would be highly useful for science policy: the predictability of researcher productivity over an entire career, and the predictability of when in a career scientists make their most important discoveries. To close, I will draw some broader conclusions from these results about the future of science, and I'll describe strategies and dangers for scientific discovery in the age of big data.

Biography

Aaron Clauset, Ph.D.

Aaron Clauset is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and the BioFrontiers Institute at the University of Colorado Boulder and is External Faculty at the Santa Fe Institute. He received a Ph.D. in Computer Science, with distinction, from the University of New Mexico, a BS in Physics, with honors, from Haverford College, and was an Omidyar Fellow at the prestigious Santa Fe Institute. In 2016, he was awarded the Erdos-Renyi Prize in Network Science, and since 2017, he has been a Deputy Editor at Science Advances, responsible for the Social, Computing, and Interdisciplinary Sciences.

Clauset is an internationally recognized expert on network science, data science, and machine learning for complex systems. He is best known for his seminal work on developing statistical and computational methods for clustering networks, predicting missing links, and modeling highly-variable quantities in complex systems. His research program aims to advance computation as a third pillar of science, co-equal with experiment and mathematical theory as a method for generating new scientific knowledge. This program spans both methods development and applications and includes work on evolutionary biology, cancer, the statistics of global terrorism, and the “science” of science itself. His work has appeared in many prestigious scientific venues, including Nature, Science, PNAS, SIAM Review, Science Advances, Nature Communications, AAAI, and ICDM. His work has also been covered in the popular press by Quanta Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, The Economist, Discover Magazine, Wired, the Boston Globe, and The Guardian.

10:00-10:45amSendhil Mullainathan, University of ChicagoMachine and Human Intelligence: Algorithms as a Source of Bias or Insight

Biography

Dr. Mullainathan is the Roman Family University Professor of Computation and Behavioral Science at Chicago Booth. His current research uses machine learning to understand complex problems in human behavior, social policy, and especially medicine, where computational techniques have the potential to uncover biomedical insights from large-scale health data. He currently teaches a course on Artificial Intelligence. Prior to joining Booth, Mullainathan was the Robert C. Waggoner Professor of Economics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University, where he taught courses about machine learning and big data.  He began his academic career at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

In past work he has combined insights from economics and behavioral science with causal inference tools—lab, field, and natural experiments—to study social problems such as discrimination and poverty. He recently co-authored Scarcity: Why Having too Little Means so Much and writes regularly for the New York Times. Additionally, his research has appeared in a variety of publications including the Quarterly Journal of Economics, Science, American Economic Review, Psychological Science, the British Medical Journal, and Management Science.

Dr. Mullainathan helped co-found a non-profit to apply behavioral science (ideas42), co-founded a center to promote the use of randomized control trials in development (the Abdul Latif Jameel Poverty Action Lab), serves on the board of the MacArthur Foundation, has worked in government in various roles, is affiliated with the NBER and BREAD, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Dr. Mullainathan is a recipient of the MacArthur “Genius Grant,” has been designated a “Young Global Leader” by the World Economic Forum, was labeled a “Top 100 Thinker” by Foreign Policy Magazine, and was named to the “Smart List: 50 people who will change the world” by Wired Magazine (UK). His hobbies include basketball, board games, googling, and fixing up classic espresso machines.

10:45-11:30amRobin Dowell, University of ColoradoCracking the Regulation Code

Abstract

Cracking the Regulation Code

Dr. Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), describes DNA as the “language of life”. It’s a language written in a cryptic, simple four-letter biochemical alphabet. The NIH has spent millions to record, or write down the code in books, a.k.a. genomes. Volumes with titles as exciting as “Human”, “Mouse”, and more recently “Owl monkey” have been release over the last 20 years. Reading those books is the next major challenge of biology.

In December of 2020, code breakers announced they had finally deciphered a message left 51 years earlier by the Zodiac Killer. Some find it astonishing that it took years to decode this one message. The time commitment necessary to crack the Zodiac’s cipher is just a fraction of what it will take to crack the code of life.

Deciphering the human genome, with all its complexity, is a far more challenging task than breaking the Zodiac’s code. Each human genome encodes massive amounts of information in billions of bases. Readout of the genome results in not only a startling diversity of cell types, tissues, and systems, but also how each cell responds to its environment. Our challenge is to decode the genome and understand how it is regulated. This challenge requires some patience and dedication devoted to the Zodiac’s message. While it is not a fast process, it is a necessary and thrilling ride. Ultimately, decoding the genome has vast implications for agriculture, ecology, and medicine.

Biography

Robin Dowell, D.Sc.

Robin Dowell is an Associate Professor in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology and Computer Science at University of Colorado Boulder. Dr. Dowell is also co-founder of the Boulder biotech startup Arpeggio Biosciences and holds a patent for the assessment of transcription factor activity.

In the human genome, the majority of disease-associated mutations reside within regulatory regions, but how these mutations lead to disease is not well understood.  To tackle this problem, Dr. Dowell uses computational biology and molecular genetics to decipher transcription regulation and the activity of transcription factors, the major drivers of regulation.  In addition to pursuing translational research activities, Dr. Dowell is a dedicated educator focused on bringing bioinformatics and data science initiatives to the University of Colorado Boulder campus.

Dowell earned two bachelor’s degrees (Computer Engineering and Genetics) from Texas A&M University, a D.Sc. in Biomedical Engineering from Washington University in St Louis, and did postdoctoral research at MIT. She is a member of the Linda Crnic Institute and a Boettcher Investigator.

12:00-1:00pmThe Evolution of Machine IntelligenceLessons from a Lifetime of Science and Half a Lifetime of Behavioral Genetics

Abstract

Lessons from a Lifetime of Science and Half a Lifetime of Behavioral Genetics

Each presenter will speak for 20 minutes in order to set the stage of the past, present, and future of Artificial Intelligence.

Biography

Larry Hunter, Ph.D.

Larry Hunter

Larry Hunter is the Director of the University of Colorado’s Computational Bioscience Program and a Professor of Pharmacology (School of Medicine) and Computer Science (Boulder).

Larry is widely recognized as one of the founders of bioinformatics; he served as the first President of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), and created several of the most important conferences in the field, including ISMB, PSB and VizBi. Larry’s research interests span a wide range of areas, from cognitive science to rational drug design. He has published more than 100 scientific papers, holds two patents and has been elected a fellow of both the ISCB and the American College of Medical Informatics. His primary focus recently has been the integration of natural language processing, knowledge representation, machine learning and advanced visualization techniques to address challenges in interpreting data generated by high throughput molecular biology.

He received a Ph.D. in computer science from Yale University in 1989, and then joined the National Institutes of Health as a staff scientist, first at the National Library of Medicine and then at the National Cancer Institute, before coming to Colorado in 2000.

Biography

Mira Murati

Mira Murati holds a Bachelor of Engineering from Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. She is currently the SVP of Research, Product & Partnerships at OpenAI and has been working on practical applications of technology and its impact on society. The goal of OpenAI is to advance digital intelligence in a way that is most likely to benefit humanity as a whole. 

Mira has previously led the product and engineering teams at Leap Motion building spatial human-machine interfaces. She also led the design, development, and launch of vehicle products at Tesla Motors including the Model X, as well as innovative programs in aerospace.

Biography

Craig J. Mundie

Craig J. Mundie is President of Mundie & Associates. He joined Microsoft in 1992 and became the Principal Technology-Policy Executive. In 2014, he retired from Microsoft as Chief Research and Strategy Officer. Previously he was CEO and co-Founder of Alliant Computer Systems. From 2015-16, he was co-Executive Chairman of Bridgewater Associates. He is a Director of the Institute for Systems Biology and an advisor to Microsoft, Bridgewater, Exicure, SomaLogic, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), and the Cleveland Clinic. Craig served Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Obama on the NSTAC and Obama on PCAST.

1:00-2:45pmCraig, Mira, LarryPanel Discussion

Abstract

Panel Discussion

Craig, Mira, Larry Hunter, and Larry Gold will discuss philosophical and technical aspects of AI.

The audience is welcome to ask questions through Slido on the right hand panel.

Biography

Craig J. Mundie

Craig J. Mundie is President of Mundie & Associates. He joined Microsoft in 1992 and became the Principal Technology-Policy Executive. In 2014, he retired from Microsoft as Chief Research and Strategy Officer. Previously he was CEO and co-Founder of Alliant Computer Systems. From 2015-16, he was co-Executive Chairman of Bridgewater Associates. He is a Director of the Institute for Systems Biology and an advisor to Microsoft, Bridgewater, Exicure, SomaLogic, the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR), and the Cleveland Clinic. Craig served Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Obama on the NSTAC and Obama on PCAST.

Biography

Mira Murati

Mira Murati holds a Bachelor of Engineering from Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. She is currently the SVP of Research, Product & Partnerships at OpenAI and has been working on practical applications of technology and its impact on society. The goal of OpenAI is to advance digital intelligence in a way that is most likely to benefit humanity as a whole. 

Mira has previously led the product and engineering teams at Leap Motion building spatial human-machine interfaces. She also led the design, development, and launch of vehicle products at Tesla Motors including the Model X, as well as innovative programs in aerospace.

Biography

Larry Hunter, Ph.D.

Larry Hunter

Larry Hunter is the Director of the University of Colorado’s Computational Bioscience Program and a Professor of Pharmacology (School of Medicine) and Computer Science (Boulder).

Larry is widely recognized as one of the founders of bioinformatics; he served as the first President of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), and created several of the most important conferences in the field, including ISMB, PSB and VizBi. Larry’s research interests span a wide range of areas, from cognitive science to rational drug design. He has published more than 100 scientific papers, holds two patents and has been elected a fellow of both the ISCB and the American College of Medical Informatics. His primary focus recently has been the integration of natural language processing, knowledge representation, machine learning and advanced visualization techniques to address challenges in interpreting data generated by high throughput molecular biology.

He received a Ph.D. in computer science from Yale University in 1989, and then joined the National Institutes of Health as a staff scientist, first at the National Library of Medicine and then at the National Cancer Institute, before coming to Colorado in 2000.

3:00-3:45pmDan Shefet, Association for Accountability & Internet DemocracyRegulating AI

Abstract

Regulating AI

Since the Symposium in 2019, we have witnessed a clear trend towards stronger privacy protection both in the US (especially California) and in Europe. In addition, the influence of platforms on behavior and ultimately democracy has been recognized.

The European Commission’s Digital Services Act was published on the 15th of December 2020 and creates a new liability standard for such platforms. The latest development in tech regulation is the Commission’s draft Regulation on Artificial Intelligence (published on 21 April).

This presentation will focus on this recent initiative,e which may be seen as the logical sequel to privacy and accountability regulation.

Biography

Dan Shefet, J.D.

Dan Shefet is a French lawyer, born in Denmark, and the author of the individual specialist report to UNESCO on ‘Online Radicalization’, Expert with the Council of Europe on the Internet Ombudsman, and President of AAID. Dan holds a philosophy degree and a law degree from the University of Copenhagen in addition to law studies in France. He specializes in European law as well as Human Rights, in general, and in the IT environment, in particular. Dan is a frequent speaker at international conferences on IT law, data privacy, and content regulation. In 2014, he founded the Association for Accountability and Internet Democracy (AAID). The main objective of this association is to introduce a general principle of accountability on the internet in order to secure the protection of human integrity.

3:45-4:45pmRebecca Trumbull & Eric Trumbull23 & Us

Abstract

23 & Us

What’s in a [family] name? That which we call a Trumbull by any other surname would feel as sweet? Or would it?

Or how about Murphy?

Or how about going from thinking your family’s heritage is Spanish to learning that the heritage is Pakistani? And how reliable is that information, anyway?

The two youngest Trumbull siblings take us through the journey of their lives as the “mistakes” of the family – though mistakes of a different kind than what they had thought all their lives. What they discover late in their lives is that lifelong family friends were intertwined in ways they had never anticipated. They will explore the nature of “family,” of genetics, of identity, in a world that changed for them a few years ago from the results of DNA testing.

What is the significance of our family name? And why does it seem important to us? What influence does it have on our identity? What’s in your name? What difference does biology make?

And who, by the way, owns the truth about one’s own self?

And what do so many people with “genetic identity issues” mean for the society at large? for the social work community? for the scientific community? for politics and education, finance and social services, etc.?

Biography

Rebecca Trumbull

Trumbull is trained as an architectural historian and never veers far from her chosen path, maintaining a love of architecture and, in particular, planned communities such as Sunnyside Gardens in Queens, NY. While living in Chicago she became a docent extraordinaire for the Chicago Architecture Center’s Architectural River Cruise. Nurturing a love of her interest in medicine, she enjoyed a career in academic medicine for twenty years of her life in the role of Strategic Planner in a plethora of top notch schools of medicine throughout the US, including UPenn, Stanford, UCSF, UChicago, and Northwestern. She recently retired from Stanford University, her most beloved academic institution, where she worked in the Distinguished Careers Institute, a program for people in later life returning to campus for a year or more to reflect upon their lives and reassess their purpose, wellness, and community. She and her husband live in Berkeley, California, in the ninth of nine houses they have renovated throughout their lives together. Her children, Daniel and Bettina, have brought tremendous joy to their lives.

 

Biography

Eric Trumbull, Ph.D.

Eric Trumbull, Ph.D., is a retired professor of Theatre and Communications who made a living of sorts doing theatre of one kind or another – teaching theatre and directing productions in an educational setting and performing in local non-professional theatres. His interests lie primarily in the intersection of art and information/propaganda, specifically the relationship between public performance and social/political change. Since retirement, he has enjoyed performing in community theatre and working on a history of his family.

4:45-5:00pmLarry GoldClosing Remarks

Biography

Dr. Larry Gold is the Founder and Chairman Emeritus of the Board, and former CEO of SomaLogic. Prior to SomaLogic, he also founded and was the Chairman of NeXagen, Inc., which later became NeXstar Pharmaceuticals, Inc. In 1999, NeXstar merged with Gilead Sciences, Inc. to form a global organization committed to the discovery, development and commercialization of novel products that treat infectious diseases.

During his nearly 10 years at NeXstar, Dr. Gold held numerous executive positions including Chairman of the Board, Executive Vice President of R&D, and Chief Science Officer. Before forming NeXagen, he also co-founded and served as Co-Director of Research at Synergen, Inc., a biotechnology company later acquired by Amgen, Inc. Dr. Gold recently became the CEO of Lab79, a new biotech company in Boulder, Colorado.

Since 1970, Dr. Gold has been a professor at the University of Colorado at Boulder. While at the University, he served as the Chairman of the Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology Department from 1988 to 1992. Between 1995 and 2013, Dr. Gold received the CU Distinguished Lectureship Award, the National Institutes of Health Merit Award, the Career Development Award, the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Colorado Biosciences Association, and the Chiron Prize for Biotechnology. Dr. Gold was also awarded the 8th International Steven Hoogendijk Prize by the Dutch Batavian Society of Experimental Philosophy in 2018.

In addition, Dr. Gold has been a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences since 1993 and the National Academy of Sciences since 1995. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors. Dr. Gold also serves on the Board of Directors for CompleGen, Plato BioPharma, Lab79, Keck Graduate Institute, and the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study.

Dr. Gold established the Gold Lab at the University of Colorado Boulder in 1971. Starting with basic research on bacteria and bacteriophage, the lab shifted its focus to human disease following the invention of the SELEX process in 1989. The Gold Lab today focuses on the utilization of biological and information technology to improve healthcare. Dr. Gold also began holding the GoldLab Symposia in 2010, an annual event that tackles big questions in healthcare. He is determined to change healthcare for the better through teaching, research, and debate among scientists and citizens throughout the world.

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